Wild Haven Poultry

Logo of the American Poultry Association
Logo of The Livestock Conservancy

The Wild Haven Poultry

At Wild Haven we husband a variety of pure-bred poultry with a focus on heritage ducks and chickens. We currently have two breeds of chicken: Columbian Wyandottes and Barred Rocks.

 We are members of the American Poultry Association and a supporter of the work of the Livestock Conservancy. Husbanding and propagating heritage breeds is an important part of creating bio diversity.

Plymouth Rock

The Plymouth Rock with barred plumage was the original Plymouth variant. The Plymouth rock is listed as recovering by the Livestock Conservancy and has been in the American Poultry Association’s Standard of Excellence (now called Standard of Perfection) since 1874. The Plymouth Rock is known as both a meat bird and a layer producing about 200 large, brown eggs per year. 

Barred Rock chicken

Columbian Wyandotte

Columbian Wyandotte chicken looking at the camera

The Columbian Wyandotte has an interesting history. It is a variant of the Wyandotte that came from a crossbreeding of the Plymouth Rock with the Wyandotte and was first promoted at the Columbian Worlds Fair in 1893, from which it got its name. The Wyandotte was listed by the Livestock Conservancy until 2016 when it was removed. Even though it is not listed by the conservancy we keep it as a particularly interesting heritage breed.

The Wyandotte is still listed on the German Rote Liste (red list) of the Gesellschaft zur Erhaltung alter und gefährdeter Haustierrassen, or GEH, at the Vorwarnstufe (alert) level.  The Wyandotte is a popular show bird in Germany. The variant entered the APA Standard of Perfection in 1905. It is also a dual-purpose bird with brown eggs.

Poultry FAQ

Have a question not answered here? Contact us!

What about the Avian Flu?

We are following this very closely and doing everything possible to protect the flocks at Wild Haven. This includes enhanced biosecurity measures on the farm. We are members of the American Poultry Association (APA) and follow the guidance of the APA, CDC, and USDA.

It is safe to eat eggs and meat since the flu cannot be passed this way. However, the usual precautions should be followed when handling any food products.

 

Are your birds free range?

Free range can mean different things. Our birds are not caged as you would see in a commercial farm. However, they are not allowed to simply run around the fields here. That is mostly for their own protection since they would simply be picked off by the many predators here. Instead, our birds are given ample space to move and behave naturally in protected and appropriate enclosures. When possible, they are moved to pastures to graze naturally. We take great care to raise our birds as humanely and safely as possible.

Are your birds soy free?

Yes, we use all soy-free poultry feed. We understand that some people are highly sensitive to soy. We believe in transparancy when it comes to what is in your food. If you have any questions, please feel free to ask. We are happy to show you the specific feeds we use with the flock and discuss any concerns you might have.

Are you an organic farm?

We have been moving the farm toward organic. This can be a long process of auditing everything from the food supply to the wood used in the fencing and housing. 

We have moved all of the poultry feed to organic and soy free. All of the birds in the flock are from Hoover’s Hatchery in IA and were day-old when we received them. They meet the qualifications of organic but we are not yet officially certified.

Do you sell eggs?

Yes, we do have eggs for sale!

Since we have a limited supply, please contact us for availability. When demand exceeds production, we have a waitlist and can put you on it.

Our eggs are not certified organic but our birds eat on the pasture whenever possible and our supplemental feed is organic and soy free.

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